© 2018 Natural Body Bliss

Healing Body, Mind and Spirit

Cindy Odell-Bissar

Reiki Master Teacher - Practitioner & Certified Yoga Teacher - Yoga Nidra  Practitioner - Healing Therapeutics - Meditation

www.naturalbodybliss.yoga

Take better care of your body, mind and spirit with Reiki, Yoga Nidra and Alternative Healing Treatments

Meditation

Healing Body, Mind and Spirit
Cindy Odell-Bissar - Reiki Master Teacher - Practitioner & Certified Yoga Teacher
Yoga Nidra  Practitioner - Healing Therapeutics - Meditation

Meditation

Meditation is an approach to training the mind, similar to the way that fitness is an approach to training the body. But many meditation techniques exist — so how do you learn how to meditate?
 

The easiest way to begin meditating is by focusing on the breath — an example of one of the most common approaches to meditation: concentration.

Concentration meditation

Meditation involves focusing on a single point. This could entail following the breath, repeating a single word or mantra, staring at a candle flame or counting beads on a mala. Since focusing the mind is challenging, a beginner might meditate for only a few minutes and then work up to longer durations.

Mindfulness meditation

Mindfulness meditation encourages the practitioner to observe wandering thoughts as they drift through the mind. The intention is not to get involved with the thoughts or to judge them, but simply to be aware of each mental note as it arises.

Through mindfulness meditation, you can see how your thoughts and feelings tend to move in particular patterns. Over time, you can become more aware of the human tendency to quickly judge an experience as good or bad, pleasant or unpleasant. With practice, an inner balance develops

Benefits of meditation

If relaxation is not the goal of meditation, it is often a result. In the 1970s, Herbert Benson, MD, a researcher at Harvard University Medical School, coined the term “relaxation response” after conducting research on people who practiced  meditation. The relaxation response, in Benson’s words, is “an opposite, involuntary response that causes a reduction in the activity of the sympathetic nervous system.”

Since then, studies on the relaxation response have documented the following short-term benefits to the nervous system:

  • Lower blood pressure

  • Improved blood circulation

  • Lower heart rate

  • Less perspiration

  • Slower respiratory rate

  • Less anxiety

  • Lower blood cortisol levels

  • More feelings of well-being

  • Less stress

  • Deeper relaxation

Contemporary researchers are now exploring whether a consistent meditation practice yields long-term benefits, and noting positive effects on brain and immune function among meditators. Yet it’s worth repeating that the purpose of meditation is not to achieve benefits. The goal of meditation is no goal. It’s simply to be present.

How to meditate: Simple meditation for beginners

This meditation exercise is an excellent introduction to meditation techniques.

  1. Sit or lie comfortably.

  2. Close your eyes.

  3. Make no effort to control the breath; simply breathe naturally.

  4. Focus your attention on the breath and on how the body moves with each inhalation and exhalation. Notice the movement of your body as you breathe. Observe your chest, shoulders, rib cage, and belly. Simply focus your attention on your breath without controlling its pace or intensity. If your mind wanders, return your focus back to your breath.

Maintain this meditation practice for two to three minutes to start, and then try it for longer periods.

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